The Seeding Movie Review

The Seeding Movie Review

Welcome to our review of “The Seeding,” a bleak horror movie that takes viewers on a chilling journey into the desert. In this film summary, we will delve into the plot, characters, and overall atmosphere of the movie.

Directed by Barnaby Clay, “The Seeding” captivates audiences with its eerie ambience and haunting visuals. Join us as we explore the dark and twisted world of this psychosexual horror film.

A Visually Captivating Experience

“The Seeding” opens with a shocking and unsettling scene that immediately grabs your attention. The extreme close-ups of a toddler’s bloody face, as it feasts on a human finger, are enough to make anyone flinch.

This gruesome moment sets the tone for the rest of the movie, as we follow hiker Wyndham Stone (played by Scott Haze) who becomes trapped in a desolate desert canyon.

Shot in Utah, the film benefits greatly from the evocative location photography by Robert Leitzell. The desert landscape adds to the overall sense of isolation and dread, creating a visually captivating experience for viewers.

It’s clear that Clay and his team put a lot of effort into creating a haunting ambiance that lingers long after the credits roll.

A Wispy Approximation of Psychosexual Dread

While “The Seeding” succeeds in creating an eerie atmosphere, it falls short in its exploration of psychosexual dread. The film relies heavily on generic folk horror tropes and unprocessed misanthropy, leaving much to be desired in terms of psychological depth.

Writer/director Barnaby Clay presents viewers with a series of programmatic jabs at our complacence, but fails to fully develop these themes.

The Enigmatic Alina and the Tribal Children

One of the most intriguing aspects of “The Seeding” is the character of Alina, played by Kate Lyn Sheil. Alina is a mysterious woman who resides in the desolate canyon and becomes a crucial plot device in the film.

Wyndham, driven by curiosity and against his better judgment, follows one of the sadistic children he encounters in the canyon. This decision leads him down a dark and twisted path.

As Wyndham tries to escape the canyon, he repeatedly injures himself, while Alina encourages him to accept his fate. The boys from the tribe occasionally appear, cursing Wyndham or giving him false hope. Through these interactions, Clay explores themes of control and fate, leaving viewers questioning the true nature of Alina and her intentions.

Influences and Imagery

Barnaby Clay draws inspiration from various sources in “The Seeding.” In his director’s statement, he mentions environmental and elemental thrillers like “Deliverance” and “Picnic at Hanging Rock,” as well as psychological horror movies such as “Rosemary’s Baby” and “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.”

These influences are evident throughout the film, as Clay weaves together a tapestry of nightmarish imagery and unsettling moments.

The movie is divided into chapters named after the lunar cycle, further enhancing the sense of unease and otherworldliness. Clay’s use of rotting perishables and the inevitable decay of a dead bird adds to the overall atmosphere of pseudo-elemental derangement.

While these elements are visually striking, they sometimes overshadow the film’s underlying themes and character development.

Alina: Elusive or Calculated?

Kate Lyn Sheil delivers a standout performance as Alina, but the character’s enigmatic nature leaves viewers wanting more. Alina is a beguiling obstacle for Wyndham, with her cryptic dialogue and calculated opacity.

While her mysteriousness adds to the tension of the film, it can also be frustrating at times, leaving audiences craving a deeper understanding of her motivations.

The Feel-Bad Value and Rote Nastiness

“The Seeding” excels in delivering constant over-determined shocks that keep viewers on edge. However, the film’s reliance on rote nastiness and shock value can feel excessive.

While Clay and Leitzell’s images have a certain grindhouse poetry, they often lack the lyrical and articulate depth needed to truly resonate with audiences. The movie occasionally touches a nerve, but fails to leave a lasting impact.

Conclusion

In conclusion, “The Seeding” is a visually captivating yet flawed horror movie. While the film succeeds in creating an eerie atmosphere and features standout performances, it falls short in its exploration of psychosexual dread and character development. Barnaby Clay’s influences and unique visual style are evident throughout the film, but at times, they overshadow the narrative and thematic elements.

“The Seeding” is a movie that will leave you with a sense of unease and provides moments of unsettling imagery. However, it may not offer the deep psychological impact that some horror enthusiasts seek. If you’re a fan of atmospheric horror and enjoy visually striking films, “The Seeding” may be worth a watch.

FAQs:

1.What is the overall atmosphere of “The Seeding”?

“The Seeding” creates an eerie and unsettling atmosphere, thanks to its evocative location photography and haunting visuals. The desert landscape adds to the sense of isolation and dread, enhancing the overall experience for viewers.

  1. Who is Alina in “The Seeding”?

Alina is a mysterious woman who resides in the desolate canyon where Wyndham becomes trapped. She becomes a crucial plot device in the film, with her cryptic dialogue and enigmatic nature. Alina’s true intentions and motivations are left open to interpretation, adding to the tension and mystery of the movie.

  1. What are some influences on “The Seeding”?

Barnaby Clay draws inspiration from various sources, including environmental and elemental thrillers like “Deliverance” and “Picnic at Hanging Rock,” as well as psychological horror movies such as “Rosemary’s Baby” and “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.” These influences contribute to the film’s nightmarish imagery and unsettling moments.